“A Family Which Shows The Spirit Is Alive And At Work”

Last week, my husband and I traveled with our two kids to the east coast to meet up with my side of the family.  After a day or so of having fun exploring New York City, all 12 adults and 15 kids piled into a bus to attend the Papal Mass in Philadelphia, which concluded the World Meeting of Families.

I had a simple prayer intention for The Holy Father’s visit to the US last week.  Like many others, I prayed that Pope Francis would be led by the Holy Spirit, and allow the Spirit to do His work through the events of the visit.  So I was happy to read that, in the Pope’s final homily of the visit, the Holy Father reminded me that I am called to do just the same thing in my vocation:

Anyone who wants to bring into this world a family which teaches children to be excited by every gesture aimed at overcoming evil – a family which shows that the Spirit is alive and at work – will encounter our gratitude and our appreciation. Whatever the family, people, region, or religion to which they belong!

The joy of my family–the joy of all families– lies in showing that the Holy Spirit is “alive and at work.”  As far as I can tell, the best way to do that is to actively seek and see the will of God in everything.  

This, of course, is easier said than done.  Thankfully, our God is a generous and loving Father, always waiting for us to turn to Him even after we stray from His commands.  May we always seek to praise God in all that we do!

Would that all could be prophets of God’s word! Would that everyone could work miracles in the Lord’s name!


Here are a few pictures from our Papal Mass adventure:

Yes, matching tshirts were made for the occasion.

Yes, matching tshirts were made for the occasion! (Big thanks to our friend, Nate, for making the design for the back!)



I love my husband :)



Pope Francis’ biggest fan!

All glory to God in everything!





8 Of My Favorite Tweets From Pope Francis

Don’t you just love it when you turn on the news and see the Pope?


In honor of his visit to the US this week, I thought I’d round up some of my favorite Pope Francis tweets.

On the importance of reading Scripture:


On the dignity and vocation of the family:


Because this is easy to forget when you’re bogged down in your sin:


Papa is always challenging me to get a little more uncomfortable:

Again, a needed reminder:



On making sense out of suffering:

Christ is counting on YOU:

  pope usa  

Pray for Pope Francis!


What Do You Believe About The Family?

Today’s post is taken from my booklet, A Young Catholic’s Guide To The Family (a box of which just arrived in the mail for me to hand out at The World Meeting Of Families next week!).



What Do You Believe About The Family? 

“The Christian message always contains in itself the reality and the dynamic of mercy and truth that meet in Christ.”

(III Extraordinary General Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Relatio Synodi. sec. 11.)

The Catholic Church’s teaching on marriage and the family has maybe never been so unpopular as it is today. It is dismissed as backward, stuck in the Dark Ages, closed minded, and even outright hateful.

Even many of my Catholic friends seem to think that maybe the Church just gotten this one wrong. “Look,” they say, “I’m proud to be Catholic, but I just don’t have any problem with my gay friends getting married, or with my friends living together before marriage, or with divorce, or contraception, etc.”

Nobody likes feeling hated or judged, and most people don’t actually like hating others, either.

The good news is that the Church isn’t asking us to hate anyone—in word or in practice. But in order to truly understand what the Church is asking of us by inviting us to embrace Her radical teaching on marriage and the family, we’ve got some tough questions to answer. How does the child of divorced parents make her home in a church that she perceives has closed the door on her parents? Who wants to be a part of a church they understand as harboring hatred toward any certain group of people?

The questions may be difficult, but there are answers. Real, practical answers. Answers that come from the heart of God who is Love and Mercy.

This short booklet is my invitation to young people within the Church to discover those answers, and by doing so discover the hope of God’s plan for the family. I write to young people specifically because it is the families that we are creating— or just on the brink of creating— who will make up the future of not just the Church but of society and the world itself.

What will those families look like? When our children hear the word, “family,” will it conjure up warm feelings of togetherness? Or feelings of bitterness, hurt, and brokenness?

The answer to that will depend entirely on what we believe about the family today.


Young And Catholic on Life On The Rock!

My interview with Fr. Mark and Doug Barry first aired last Friday on EWTN’s Life On The Rock!  If you missed it on the air, you can catch the whole show online here.


While in Alabama, my family snuck away for a few hours to check out the Shrine of the Most Blessed Sacrament in Hanceville.  Really a beautiful place.  Here are a few of the photos we were able to snap while we were there:

IMG_8439 IMG_8448 IMG_8446





Finding Jesus In An Ed Sheeran Song


“We keep this love in a photograph
We made these memories for ourselves
Where our eyes are never closing*
Hearts are never broken
Time’s forever frozen still”

-Ed Sheeran, Photograph

[*ok, technically our eyes are closed in the picture.  But everything else applies.]

I love that picture.  It was taken while Tyler and I were still dating– long before kids, household chores, and mortgage payments.  Back when we were just a couple of college kids listening to music and taking a goofy (if somewhat mushy) selfie.  It was snapped with an iPhone and stored in a “Pictures” folder, to be looked at countless times in the days, months, and years that followed.

“So you can keep me inside the pocket of your ripped jeans, holdin’ me closer ’til our eyes meet.  You won’t ever be alone.  Wait for me to come home”

Of course, when Ed Sheeran sings that his beloved can “keep him” in the form of a photograph until they meet again, it is only an analogy; and there is a bittersweetness to it. When Tyler and I were separated by a few states after we graduated from college, I probably looked at the above picture over a hundred times.  While it made me happy to see his face in the picture, it didn’t make me miss him any less—in fact it probably made me miss him even more.

At the end of the day we all know that a picture is only a picture.  And the memories a picture brings with it can only go so far.

You Won’t Ever Be Alone


Well last week I happened to hear Photograph on the radio after leaving the adoration chapel, only this time it wasn’t so bittersweet.

As I listened to the now familiar melody, I reflected on the lyrics and on a lifetime of visits to the Blessed Sacrament Chapel— visiting Jesus present in the Eucharist in times of joy, in times of pain, and even just out of a desire to get out of the house with the kids—and the song suddenly took on a different meaning.

“The greatest love story of all time is contained in a tiny white host.” (Fulton Sheen)

“Loving can hurt.”

All the times I visited the chapel and brought Jesus the pain my heart was feeling: through teenage heartbreaks, feelings of longing, feelings of loneliness.  “You know it can get hard sometimes.”  The Love contained in that tiny white host was there even in the midst of the hurt.

“Loving can heal.”

That tiny white host has brought my life such healing through the years.  I don’t expect to know the full extent I have been healed through Jesus’ Presence in the Eucharist until I behold Him face to face in Heaven, but on this side of things, I know that “Loving can heal,” because in my visits to Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament I have truly seen how “loving can mend your soul.”

“Time’s forever frozen still.”

The Eucharist that I visit in the adoration chapel on a weekday with my two small children is the same Jesus who died for me on Calvary.  It is the same Jesus the Church’s greatest saints bowed before throughout history.  He is the same Jesus who was present in the tabernacles of the Churches in the Middle Ages, the same Jesus that faithful soldiers during WWII drew their strength from, and the same Jesus my great-great grandparents received throughout their lifetime.  Jesus is the same yesterday, today, and forever.

“You won’t ever be alone.”

Back when Tyler and I had to do the long-distance thing before we got married, the pictures we had from the times we were together were just as the song says: memories frozen in time that we could visit when we missed each other.  But a picture is just a picture.

In the Eucharist, Jesus gives us so much more.  He is able to actually deliver what the song can only dream about.  His Body, His Blood, His Soul, His Divinity–they are all actually contained in the tiny white host.  There we can keep Him closer until our eyes meet in Heaven.  And we won’t ever be alone.

“Behold, I am with you always, until the end of the age.”